Facilities


WHERE WE ARE


Facilities

FACILITIES



The building before: Amka Afrika School building opened in January, 2011. There were no doors or windows and the end was open, so the wind, dust and rain came right in. Steps up to the classrooms were rough, one was just a ramp. There was no water source, so large containers were hauled in daily for cooking and there were no facilities for handwashing.




The building after: Simon bought used doors and metal window frames in Arusha and had them shipped to Babati and installed. Amka Afrika School Foundation spent $420 to put glass in all the windows and $1,150 to have a water tank built to collect rainwater from the roof. When full, it holds 10,000 liters of water. This can be boiled or chemically treated for drinking and cooking, used for construction, to flush the toilets, and for hand washing. Finally, we had to plaster the outside of the building with cement. Without plaster, the mortar between the bricks, made of soil and water, could be washed or blown away. This took 26 bags of cement, 1 truckload of sand and a lot of water. Cost: $300.

FACILITIES
FACILITIES




Inside the classroom before: In March of 2011, Teacher Paschalina uses the only supplies she has to teach the Baby Class about numbers-- a chalkboard and chalk. The students sit at rough wooden desks, 4 to a desk. The floors are covered with a thick layer of dirt.







Inside the classroom after: In January, 2012, the classrooms received a facelift. The floors and walls were covered with a smooth layer of cement. In February a container from the United States arrived carrying desks, chairs, tables, marker boards, file cabinets, books, paper, a printer, markers, crayons, watercolors, scissors, rulers, pencils and pens, National Geographic magazines, games, microscopes and other science supplies, math manipulatives, a reading series with cassette tapes, balls, jump ropes, frisbees and more. Amka School was immediately transformed into the most up-to-date school in Babati.

FACILITIES




FACILITIES




Toilets before: This pit toilet used to be the only bathroom facility at Amka School. Everyone used it: boys, girls, teachers and visitors. During one government inspection to become a registered school with the Ministry of Education, the inspector told Simon he must have "proper toilets" before he would approve the school.





Toilets after: By January, 2012, new "proper toilets" had been built at Amka. There are three separate toilets, one for girls, one for boys, and one for adults. They have fixtures in the floor that allows water to be poured down them and are connected to a septic tank. Total cost: $1500.

FACILITIES
FACILITIES




Kitchen before: This makeshift kitchen was built hastily, when the classrooms were opened in January, 2011. There was no foundation under the walls, the floor was dirt and cooking fires were build right on the floor. The roof kept the rain off the fire, unless there was much wind or a big downpour. All the cooking supplies were removed every day because there was no way to lock them up.






Kitchen after: In October of 2012 a new kitchen was built. Starting with a foundation to support the walls, it includes a stove where the cook can build a fire and set pots on a grate, a roof that meets the top of the walls, windows covered with wire mesh and a locking door. Now the cook can keep all cooking supplies locked inside.

FACILITIES
FACILITIES

New Construction - As of January 2013, four classroom buildings are completed, including the one in the picture. Two more required construction projects are up next: a dormitory and a dining hall/multi-purpose facility, which will be built according to the approved Amka plan and construction standards. The Tanzanian Ministry of Education is now asking that residential students be housed in buildings on campus, not in hostels or neighborhood homes, where they are not always safe. We are constructing a dormitory for 20 boys and 20 girls, where we can ensure privacy, safety, and good supervision after school, nights, and weekends. The roof will be on before the end of January. Amka will also need a dining hall, both to feed residential students and to serve lunch to 100 kids every day.






Even a coat of primer makes a huge difference on the classrooms. Under construction on the left is a dormitory, which will be under roof very soon. Volunteer Chris Green, who visited in November with a mission group from 1st Presbyterian Church of Davenport, Iowa, believed that the traditional diet served to residential students at Amka's off-site hostel needed more protein. She and her friends have donated money for a chicken coop and chickens. Clucking, pecking, and egg production are about to begin.

FACILITIES